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in education today. you are one of the sponsors, the national education association, of this incredible summit meeting. tell the folks watching now a little better about the who, what, when, where, why. >> we started an idea in a meeting with secretary duncan, what if we brought together the leaders, the ministers from the country's redoing an international assessment, and we did not dream it would come about to the extent it has. last year was such a positive experience from everyone. as i talked to fellow union presidents from around the world, their reaction was so positive. they went out to dinner together, had informal conversations, in addition to -- they said, "i spent more time with the minister of education than i did in three months, six months." the level of conversation really did what we know happens when you want collaboration. you have got to sit down and build those relationships. the big winners are students in education. >> so getting people to sit and talk with each other? >> yes, it is really important. if the minister of education and union president have such a poor relat
in education today. thank you for sitting with us. >> happy to be here. >> there was a summit last year. at the end of the summit they published a paper that had four -- 5 points. at the end, it came around teaching and it had to do with teacher evaluations. >> this is hard. we were talking about this this morning. the conversation is going on around the world, which is exciting, particularly for the united states. before i get your answer, we have to praise this administration for getting involved on in the -- involved in the international conversation. we have never done that before. we are part of that conversation, which i think is very positive for us. so, a teacher evaluation. every teacher knows they make a difference in how a child learns. they would not come to work if they did not believe that. the challenge is, how do you assess what they are achieving with kids? what everybody objects to within the profession is you cannot tell if you're doing a good job based on the score on a single test. what a child does on a single test, on a single day does not do justice to the child'
that has a lot of potential to open up better avenues for educators and districts to make better decisions and get evidence in a way and in some ways that type of tool would make what they're doing a lot easier. >> you are the designated responder here. >> thanks for bringing this great panel. i am not going to spend time adjusting all of them. it will make this proposal better and stronger. for the younger people in the audience may be 30 years you will be on a panel like this and somebody will ask what it was like before the apps store. people will be shocked not because you are old but they can't imagine life existed before the apps store. it is so incredible and what made the market? where does it come from? what it is is transparency about what you're getting and barriers to entry. what we want to do is take the entrepreneurial energy in the u.s. and around the world and use it to give teachers better tools and consumer report for educational technology to educate the entrepreneurial energy developing better schools so the panel has got it right in terms of what we are trying to do. t
to be the guy who is very conservative, catholic, he's got a great education track record but i think is going to be well-positioned to be, if we're going to modernize someone we feel safer, he could be the guy. >> one last word on the millennials since we did have that question. according to the data i missing, it doesn't look like obama shares the millennial vote, its operational shores -- is creeping up. he did win it 66-32 in 2008. he's not there yet, 34-point margin. the pupil had about a 30-point margin. that's getting close. 56% of what all is said and done he may be wind up with a bird outside margin among millennials, but just not as big as he had in 2008, and, of course, another related question is whether and to what extent these votes will turn out. in 2012. so keep in mind in 2008 it wasn't that astronomical. >> the racial mix. >> absolutely right. >> the white millennials are noticeably more liberal. >> he was at 55% among whites under 30. in our poll we have him down to 50. >> that's pretty good. but anyway, short answer is looking pretty good for obama, maybe not quite as good
that its economic growth is slowing and inflation is on the rise. when it comes to education, brazil ranks 53rd in the world. it is an issue the country needs to address so it can seize its momentum not be left on the sideline. and downtown, there are throwing up the buildings at a dizzying pace. but it takes more than muscle to lift the country. all of this prosperity was built on natural resources but of the country wants to do more than supply commodities to china, it needs human helped to. >> you will not find many skilled workers on the streets. it is here in the poor neighborhoods, not far from the business district, that you find that challenge. if this country ever wants to develop from an emerging economy, it is going to have to do a better job educating its population. gdp but the six largest and blow in education. >> she is an education campaign and fighting vested interest to change those figures. >> the political issue in brazil, there are 2 million voters that can decide an election. it is very hard to make changes. >> it is time for school in this neighborhood. this is the s
to photography classes. >> good evening. so this is the regular meeting of the board of education of san francisco unified school district for september 25, 2012 is now called to order. roll call please. (roll call). >> thank you. >> if you would like to join us for the pledge of allegiance. pledge one and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. okay. i get the first word. giants go. another world series champion. okay. seriously let's get back to the agenda. item a approval of board minutes for the regular minutes of march 13, 2012, august 14, 2012, september 11, 2012. is there a motion for all three? >> [inaudible] >> is there a second. >> second. >> any corrections? roll call please. >> thank you. >> yes. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for b
. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for being here in the board room. just a few thoughts to share with you. we are coming upon a very special election in the next few weeks and people will have an opportunity to vote and as you're deciding on candidates and ballot measures to vote for i would like to draw your attention to proposition 30 and 38. with the understanding that if these prop propositions pass they have significant impact on funding. if neither one passes financial resources will be greatly diminished for schools in california and specifically here in san francisco. the lodge cuts include that we will be forced to shorten the school year by five days this year and nine days next year in addition to the substantial cuts that will be at school sites and for students. i want to encourage all of
>>> on our broadcast tonight, from education nation in new york, drawing the line. the president today with a strong new warning to iran, plus what he had to say about the recent violence against americans. where they stand. a rare chance to hear from both candidates right here on one critical issue, education and how to fix american schools. our interviews with the president and governor romney here tonight. >>> the replacement. the call that had football fans across the country howling at the nfl to bring back the professional referees. >>> and tighten up. how little space could you live in? some folks in san francisco are about to find out. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening and tonight we're in midtown manhattan, high above the new york city public library, which for the past few days has been the headquarters of education nation, our annual summit on education where today we heard from both president obama and mitt romney, a rare and fascinating opportunity to hear them both out on one issue in the same day, something th
to politicize the issue and do a lot of teacher bashing. >> the president goes after mitt romney on education. and right on cue, mitt romney goes after the teachers. >> the teachers union has a responsibility to care for the interests of the teachers. >> former governor howard dean and atlanta mayor react to mitt romney's educated mess. >>> scott walker and paul ryan come out against union busting. eugene robinson and bill roden on why the nfl gets what it paid for. and on national voter registration day, ten million latino voters are in danger of being disenfranchised. we'll bring you the shocking details of a new report that could swing the election to mitt romney. being disenfranchised. we'll bring you the shocking details of a new report that could swing the election to mitt romney. >> good to have you with us. thanks for watching. americans are up in arms after a blown call in a football game. it's amazing what gets the country's attention. the nfl is in a labor mess because millionaires are trying to save a little money by busting the referee's union. i'll have more to say about this in
will consider to measures to raise taxes for education. which one is better for schools? >> is hard to say which one is exactly better for schools because it depends on what your view of what works best in government. do you think should handle the money, who do you trust and how much you want to pay? let's compare proposition 38 and 30 >> guarantees politicians cannot touch it >> proposition 38 is waging a new campaign to funnel billions to our schools. attorney molly maunder is the biggest backer spending $20 million of art. she says the money will not go to the general fund but directly to the schools k through 12 and to early childhood programs. >> the money in 38 for the schools is barricaded from sacramento >> prop. 38 would raise the income taxes for almost anyone on a sliding scale. $75,000, you pay $1,082. 150,000, shell out 2700 in taxes and this will last for 12 years >> governor brown wants voters to support his ballot initiative, proposition 30. it raises sales tax a quarter percent for the next four years and raises income tax on those making more than $250,000 annual for the next
, 2012 meeting of the joint meeting of the san francisco board of education and the san francisco board of supervisors. the city and school district select committee. my name is david campos and i am the chair of the committee. madam secretary, if you can please take the roll? before we do that i wanted to thank the following members of sfgtv staff who are covering the meeting today. mark bunch and bill dylan. madam secretary. >> did you want me to read the first item? >> roll call. >> roll call. we haven't had one. supervisor campos? >> present. >> supervisor olague? >> here. >> thank you. supervisor chu? >> he's in route. >> [speaker not understood]? >> here. >> [speaker not understood]? >> and commissioner mendosa. >> here. >> thank you very much. madam secretary, if you can please call item number 1. >> thank you, supervisor. it's item 120 3 93, hearing on the student drop out rates as introduced by supervisor cohen. >> this is an item that has been introduced by supervisor cohen. before i turn it over to supervisor cohen, i want to thank her for being here. i just wanted to sort of
for teachers and the educational reforms they support. in president of the american federation of teachers, the chicago teachers' national union, wrote and i quote . . . weingarten, the president of the american federation of teachers, the chicago teachers' national union. randi, thank for joining us. >> it's always great to be with you, eliot. >> eliot: thank you. you did reform late the education conversation with the strike. explain what you wanted to do and what you think you accomplished? >> no one wants a strike, and a strike is to be avoided virtually at all no one goes into a strike willingly. but what happened in chicago was there has been 15 years of closing schools and teaching to the test as opposed to teaching children, so parents and the educators, together -- that's why parents supported the strike by a two to three to one basis, talked about how we need the tools for teachers, and resources for kids, so we make every single school in chicago a school where parents want to send their kids and educators want to work. a school where kids actually get pre
how vitally dependent the country is on a trained, educated, likable, young adult population. we have not quite recognized the deficit we have. as for the state level, a lot has happened. we work at the state level. we attempt to put together coalitions that recognize the importance of educating kids from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more business people who get the reality. they are understanding the situation and are increasingly ready to take action. in the area lisa pointed to, educating early solves educational problems. we published a report last march. it is on the website. it is a way to reduce special education costs. we know quality pre-kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields in reduction in special education costs alone enough to pay for the services. at the state level, there is an understanding that takes place that people can act on. it can better be done on the school district level. the power of technology is enabling people at local levels to act in ways they cannot at the federal level. as they act at the local and state level, it becomes clear that th
that were not given adequate education that they deserved yesterday, then i can talk about that. >> so, you probably know what the numbers were looking like 10 years ago as i was. thank you, mr. chair. that's all i have. >> colleagues, i'd like to turn it over to public comment. i think it's really important for us to hear from members of the public. so, i have a number of speaker cards that i'm going to read. but any member of the public who would like to speak on items 1 and 2, i would ask that you come forward. so, the speaker cards are from sharon hewett, robert woods, lilly ratcliff, jamil patterson, peter alexander, and ace washington. please come up. you each have two minutes. and we also have shaman walton. >>> hi, i'm [speaker not understood], and i did not fill out a card. i do apologize. one thing we're talking about solutions. first i wanted you to picture this. my kids' friends, when i encourage them to go back to school after they graduate, say, hey, i'm not going to live beyond 21. what for? there's hopelessness. solution, maybe we need cameras in the classrooms. maybe we nee
more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >> a campaign marked by harsh accusations, it is rare to see a movement of bipartisan levity but that came today courtesy of mitt romney. this is what he had to say after being introduced by president clinton. >> if there is one thing we have learned in this election season, by the way, it is that a few words from bill clinton can do a man of lot of good. all i need to do now is wait a couple of days for that bounce to happen >> that was a clear nod to the president clinton's speech praising the president. both brawny and president obama were talking about foreign policy today in new york. >> president obama is urging fellow leaders to take a stand against violence in the moslem world >> i do believe it is the obligation of all leaders in all countries to speak out forcefully a
of education forum with the coleman advocates and other community partner and bayville and more details will be followed. >> thank you. item e, parent advisory council report. pap representative. >> good evening commissioners. thank you for the time. i am tony telrico and my daughter is at sunset elementary school. she's a joyful learner and proud of her school community. this is my year on the pac so i'm a month in and we had two engaging meetings so far. we are looking forward to working there. it's to represent parent voices and perspective to inform of board of education policies and this will address our issues for this school year and our process for developing action plans to pursue those issues. the pac looked at data about student achievement over the past several years, identify ways to engage families to strengthen the district's initiatives and reviewing major questions and concerns that heard from families during our community conversations that the pac has conducted over the last few years. at the beginning of this school year the pac members met with superintenden
-speech and is with fire the foundation for individual rights and education. hadley, you were not very political. what happened? >> i have opinions but struggled what i believe, when to speak up, and when to be quiet. john: the because of friends ? >> there were a variety of students that were very mature but others who could be loudmouth that overshadows the culture with a small group to make a lot of noise it can be intimidating. congressmen tom 10 credo was invited but the speech never happened. john: he has positions on immigration that you disagree. i am not in alignment with his philosophy and every issue. tax policy but not by to buy another issues. i was not present the day they shutdown the event but many were shouting there is no debate. no-space 48. that hit home. >> he was shouted down. john: somewhere outside the building and throwing rocks through the window? >> university reacted and condemned the action. unc denounce. but some people did not want to have the debate. some think my views are so illegitimate i should not say them. john: you go to campuses around the country. most illibera
of the most important of the warren court. brown versus the board of education. vo: for years, sacramento politicians have chopped away funds for our schools. today, we're forty-seventh out of fifty in per-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. >>> tonight we are taking a second look at earl warren one of the most popular governors in california history. he was elected to the state's top job three times in 1942, 1946 and 1950. he was so highly regarded that in 1946 he won the republican democratic and independent primaries and was unopposed in the general election. one of warren's major achievements at governor was to reform the prison system. bob mackenzie gives us a look at how two of the oldest california prisons changed at that time. >> reporter: by th
that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, continue to provide the kind of education and job skills that we need for our city. over the last few weeks, i have been working closely with the city college to assess their fiscal, managerial, and accreditation issues. i want to thank the people behind me. in particular, the interim chancellor pamela fisher is here, and the current trustees, natalie burke is here today, i need a barrier is also here. thank you very much. also representing our students, mr. walker is here as well. [applause] with any educational institution that has value as our city college, not only did we work with those that are currently involved with them, but we worked as a city family. there is no way to express at this time the need to have this a family together to support our city college. so also i have representatives of the comptroller's office, then rosenfield, mickey callahan, the human resources divisions that are here today, nadia from our p
is innovation, we continue to lead on this. how do we take that creative engine and get it to k-12 education so we we can see improvements and qualities and outcomes and achievements for our students? >> if you look through history, whether it is transportation, our children listed in age that our ancestors could only dream of. we have computers, we have all sorts of new things. that really doesn't seem to happen until k-12 education. if you look at research and development, in k-12 education, it is one 15th the rate, of the u.s. economy overall. it is 152-1100 rate of what we see in innovative sectors like health care. what is getting in the way? well, what we try to do is first diagnosed what is giving away. i wonder standing back, we see what can we do about it. and that is essentially a layer in which we hope to create a creative marketplace that succeeds in what normally seems to be stagnant. we have k-12 schools, 14,000 school systems. we have would-be innovators and entrepreneurs. if something seems to be separating us. what is going on in the middle? this is underlined a lot of other co
now, you asked -- supervisor cohen, you asked when did this start, when did this education drop off. it started before you were born. it's been happening a long time. so, when you said -- when you said it takes a healthy community, that means working. healthy -- if you don't work, you don't eat. and, so, this is what we're trying to do in bayview hunters point. i come here with a message for you to appeal to your better wisdom and your judgment because that's what [inaudible]. >> thank you very much, sir. >>> thank you, sir. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >>> i'm even too old to really address this because i'm over 10 years removed. but i can remember when tupac died and one of my cool teachers put "we love you, tupac" a picture of him in the class. and the principal told her to remove it. and that just points to the disconnect. i mean, instead of trying to get me to understand shakespeare first, who i might not like or don't care about, try to show me how writing a thesis is equivalent to writing a good song. you've got to meet the youth where they're at. and what i see from
full well many students who have not been able to participate in college education. and even in [speaker not understood], because by the way, you have to be academically ready to ascend and not just be at the labor reer level. -- laborer level. so, i'm happy, supervisor cohen, and president chiu, you understand where we are at and we are not turning a blind aye to this issue -- [multiple voices] >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner fewer. >> yes, i'd like to comment a little bit about looking at the state. quite frankly, when i saw this data, i myself was very, very shocked particularly about the students not on track for graduation. supervisor, i share your concern. i think as far as the pathway, this is a pathway to nowhere. so, i just want to emphasize about the difference between feel better and do better. i know if you're not really in this conversation all the time, what does it really mean when we give two sets of data that say, on track c or better and on track d or better. on that track d or better is a lie, it is a lie to all our students because we instituted a
at this testimony. i would like to begin by thanking you for your genuine passion on this topic can educate all americans about the importance. i know is we've spent time over the years, we think about of course your home state and robust aviation community in the state of wisconsin and what happens over the course of the most spectacular week of the year at the oshkosh air show with bea. and with that said tamayo so juxtaposed my thoughts and comments regarding matches the home base of operation that i come from at new york's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion in the air space challenges have across places like the metropolitan area and here i am the metropolitan area. all of this site, mr. chairman and certainly two ranking member costello as well, and over the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they had been in your congressional districts across the country and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. your palate hearings, conduct of information on sessions and have an open door as he sought not to assign
. and everything, all five issues, education, economic development, all those issues are something that's been passed down under, hasn't been taken care of. i'm glad to see the education part of this is coming forth because without the ebbv indication we cannot have nothing. i'm here to say and ed lee, hear me loud and clear because it starts from room 200. everything that -- all these boards, they're listening right now. mr. ed lee, this a-c-e and i'm telling you i'm on the case and we're going make sure that we implement this outmigration in my lifetime for my three kids. the thing about it, why i'm so adamant, ladies and gentlemen, i've been doing this for 20 years. but i have children that have children that have children. so, therefore, i'm here representing three cs. it is sort of historical. yes, i'm 58 years old, but i have great grand kids and all be damned that i've been here all these 20 years and when i'm in the position to help out their generation, they can say pa-pa helped us. i want to be the pa-pa for all my african-american community because it seems like our leadership is in
with the new budget cuts. of course, my university is being privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against future revenues. how did they deal with these social problems when the economic problems were far worse than what we can imagine today? this is from larry halprin's. and it has these quotes from roosevelt on the wall. he said in one of his talks to the people, "the test is not whether we have more, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little". it's a different philosophy than that which we have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig
conversation for us to have with our families because so much of our education system is rooted in mediocrity. so, trying to convince our families that there is a better should not have been a conversation we were spending any time on, and we did. and it took us a year to get through that. there has been growth in the last three years. it's slow, and it's not enough and we acknowledge that. we're starting to see a lot of the blending of services both at the city and the school district, which include after school and out of school time. and i think that that has been a tremendous support for so many of our kids. but i also want to acknowledge that all of our 21st century funding has been eliminated in our high schools and that has impact. and these are the constant things that we're dealing with. we work off of a budget that's projected and then we're told you really don't have that money. so, the scaling up and then scaling back is just part of our reality. and it's not an excuse, but it's a reality. but we continue to invest in our communities and we continue to invest in our schools. and i
is the first time i met you. i'm a product of a public school. every bit of my education has been k through 12 has been through public school. so, i'm trying to figure out at what point -- what point do we start to lose this battle? that's why i asked for the longitudinal study the last ten years. it would be great if we could go even further back than that. i'm going to -- mr. arm entrout, i want to ask you to follow-up to get the answers to the questions that i propose here today. this last question really is -- i'm just looking for a better understanding, i've got? some concrete solutionses that the unified school district is going to be implementing to help combat these high drop-out rates. * i've heard some solutions today about the partnerships that you've passed, that -- partnerships with the city and the cbos and i've heard about a through g requirementses. i agree like many other members, a through g should be the standard no matter what. i do remember when i came through, i graduated -- there were some students who did finish with a through g and some didn't but still were
." michelle rhee is the head of students first, an organization that hopes to reform public education. she, of course, is the former head ofure d.c. schools. former speaker newt gingrich is rejoining us. he does not have a new book out, but his wife calista, does have a new book out, a children's book that will be coming out tomorrow. bob woodward, an associate editor of the "washington post" is the author of "the price of politics" he's written more books than this entire table combined. well, maybe not when you put newt gingrich in there. and pulitzer prize-winning author hendrick smith who has a new book called, "who stole the american dream?" all you people are here to sell books. that's pretty clear. ( laughter ) no, i'm teasing. we're glad to have all of you. mark zandi, let's just talk about what is the state of the american economy right now with just five weeks before we get to this election? the job numbers came out this week on tuesday. we had some very good economic news. housing numbers were up. consumer confidence was up. reports of companies hiring for the holidays seem to
are perhaps the most important innovation in public education over the last generation in the united states. but there are many myths and misconceptions about charters and about the motivation and the goal of many in the movement. use of some of that play out in the recent chicago future strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states to the best charters are either an unmitigated good or alternatively, an existential threat. .. >> if we are going to get back to the living standards of america, we are only going to do that by lifting up and truly changing public education in this country. that is the only way that is ever going to be achieved. so with that, let me introduce roland fryer. he is going to summarize his paper. he is going to do 34 slides in one hour. >> thank you very much. it is great to be here again and to see so many familiar faces. >> let's start with this first. good morning. we all know that education in america, visited the show that our performance has grown over the last 30 to 40 years. if you look at the latest statistics as to how many schools didn't
. >> the president goes after mitt romney on education. and right on cue, mitt romney goes after the teachers. >> the teaers union has a responsibility tcareor the inrestofteachers. >> former governor howard dean and atlanta mayor react to mitt romney's educated mess >>> scott walker and pl ryan come out against union busting. eugene robinson alen on why the nfl gets what it paid for. and on national voter registration day, ten million lati voters are in danger of being disenfranchised. we'll brin you the shocking details of aew rept tt coswthle to mitt romney. >> good to have you with us. thanks for watching. americans are up in arms after a blown call in a football game. it's amazing what gets the country's attention. the nfl is in a labor mess because millionais e trying to setlon busting the referee's union. i'll have more to say about this in a few moments. >>> but today we learned what kind of labor issue we will have on our hands if mitt romney is president. it will affect tuture of education in this country. ttnearpa in nbc's education nation summit today. the candidate had so few spe
? commissioner wynn. >>i would like to appoint brian fox to the public education enenrichment committee. >> yes, i have two and -- [inaudible] to the public education enrichment fund. >> any others? okay. seeing none let's move on to the next item. this is the item l, special order of business. i now call the public hearing and adoption of the tentative agreement between the district and the international federation of technical engineers, local 21. is there a motion? >> so moved. >> is there a second? >> second. >> reading of recommendation by superintendent or designee. >> thank you president yee. this say tentative agreement that we reached with local 21 r and extension of the existing collective bargaining agreement and we ask that the board adopt that agreement and the required public disclosure requirements. i want to thank the bargaining teams from local 21. they represent our it work force. >> so there's no public speakers that signed up for this and are there comments from the board or the superintendent? seeing none roll call please. >> thank you. (calling roll). >> seven aye
. but when it comes to education we are not. we are dead last. as the world becomes more technoledge kal, 20 years from now, what is america. when we are boeing to understand the technology that we are going to be relying upon. >> if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped it. moved my family out. people in the ghetto have no clue of where we are going. that is what we need to get them excited on. we need to get them excited about stem. educating people to caulk into the world and contribute and participate. the common thread throughout the middle east and america is a lot of young people who have had education in middle eastern countries, and there is no job at the end of the line for them and this creates huge resentment and frustration you have seen a lot of leaders being toppled. what do leaders and countries need to adopt to stop this cycle now youth who feel not able to fulfill their potential? >> economic development. when you have young people with amazing ideas. you don't have the system to actually deal with this huge issue add to that the governments that have fallen, the new st
connections and having a context. when we start talking to people about the importance of school and education, if we have generations of folks who have maybe not graduated from high school or don't have geds or have had a hard time with getting a job and you say you need to go to school to get a job, and that's not something that they have a context for, it's about creating these internships, but also these mentoring opportunities, brown bag series where people come in and share their stories of how they ended up where they are and what that process looked like. and i think for me the most memorable one was when we did it with mayor brown, and he talked about it was right time, right place. that there was somebody that was there to help him. it wasn't because he had this really great plan did & it was all in alignment. he went to san francisco state and somebody took a chance on him and said, this is a program, you're going to be on probation. but if you don't make it, if you don't do what you're supposed to, it's on you. and that really resonated with a lot of the young folks that we had the
and pacific islanders were receiving a different quality of education. in 2007 we found that african-americans were ranked dead last in api scores for all major urban school districts in california. this was the low below even special education students in their api scores for [speaker not understood]. the next year coleman fought for the board of education to close the achievement gap. that resolution to ensure the upcoming district strategic plan was focused on addressing the racial achievement grape in inequity in our school. thankfully the board passed that unanimously. however, the gap has widened, especially for african-american students. many of you might have seen the report that came out talking about the 2011 released analysis comparing the progress of california school districts. unfortunately san francisco received an overall grade of d. and in particular the african-american students as it relates to sfusd, we ranked 127 out of 128. i want to have one of our parent leaders, olivia gudeau, give a statement. >> hi, my name is olivia harris. i am a san francisco resident,
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